The New York Institute for Psychoanalytic Self Psychology

The New York Institute for Psychoanalytic Self Psychology (NYIPSP), SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0369.

Approved CE Courses
    15-week courses meet for 90 minutes each, total 22.5 contact hours
  • Fall Term: September - January; Spring Term: February - June
  • Time: 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. or 9:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. weekly Monday-Thursday
    3-week courses meet 3 times for 2 hours each, total 6 contact hours
  • Fall Term: September - October on alternate Sundays starting the second Sunday of September
  • Time: 12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

Costs, refunds, and cancellation policies:

Cost for NYIPSP Institute Courses: $450 for a 15-week course. Refunds are available no later than one week after the first session of the course. A $30 administrative fee for refund request.

101.1 Psychoanalytic Models and Core Developmental Issues I: An Historical Overview

David MacIsaac, 22.5 contact hours

This is the first of a two-part course that will review psychoanalytic thought from Freud to contemporary theorists. The focus of this course will be on Freud's early shift from the Topographic to the Structural Model of the mind, underscoring his internal struggle between grounding psychoanalysis in psychology vs. biology. The course will then look at the American school of Ego Psychology built on the Freudian foundation. This course will trace the development of the object relations school begun by Melanie Klein.

After attending the course, participants will be able to
  • - Define the differences between Freud's topographic and structural models of the mind.
  • - Describe how Freud's theory moved away from his grounding psychoanalysis in the psychology of the mind to a more biological position.
  • - Discuss theories contributing to Freudian theory, such as ego psychology and object relations theory.
  • - Explain how Freud's theory contributed to ego psychology and object relations theory.
Return to top

101.2 Personality Development and Psychoanalytic Perspective I

Florence Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

This is the first of a two-part course that compares and contrasts different psychoanalytic models of development that have evolved from the understanding of human personality development. Freudian topographical and structural models, American Developmental Ego Psychology, British Object Relations, Modern Interpersonal, Intersubjectivity, and Psychoanalytic Self Psychology will be studied, establishing a framework along which essential developmental concepts of Personality can be examined.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Identify the development of personality as seen from a variety of psychoanalytic theories.
  • - Delineate the specific aspects of personality, such as character structure, narcissistic personality, selfselfobject development.

102.1 Psychoanalytic Process I: A Practicum in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Different Psychopathological Conditions

Crayton Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

This course will introduce the student to the psychoanalytic situation. Emphasis will be upon the beginning phases of treatment, with particular focus on the experience-near empathic treatment stance. The course will also deal with major clinical issues such as transference, resistance, and free association. The student will learn how to diagnose and treat the different psychopathological conditions of the self.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Explain the beginning phase of diagnosis and treatment from a self psychology perspective with the use case material.
  • - Discuss the use of Kohut's concept of empathy as a data gathering tool vital to the process of deepening the understanding of the patient.
  • - Illustrate Kohut's idea of vicarious introspection and empathic immersion, using clinical examples.
  • - Define the concepts of selfobject transference.
  • - Explain Kohut's view of resistance and free association, utilizing case material.
Return to top

103.0 Introduction to the Work of Heinz Kohut I

David MacIsaac, 22.5 contact hours

This course will focus on the early writings of Kohut. These include his early papers on music, empathy, narcissism, self, and selfobject. Particular emphasis will be placed on the fundamental switch from a biological-based drive/defense psychology to a psychology based on selfobject needs. The course will culminate with a close-up reading of Kohut's most significant work, The Analysis of the Self.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Define the concepts of selfobjects: idealizing, twinship, mirroring.
  • - Demonstrate how the empathic stance leads to the development of the selfobject transferences.
  • - Explain the resistances to the development of selfobject transferences.
  • - Describe Kohut's concepts of horizontal and vertical splits.
Return to top

103.1 Psychoanalytic Theory of Psychodiagnosis: Introduction to the Works of Heinz Kohut I

Sandra Rzetlny, 22.5 contact hours

This course will familiarize the candidate with the psychoanalytic theory of psychodiagnosis through an examination of the early writings of Heinz Kohut, in particular with a close reading of his 1971 monograph, The Analysis of the Self. Throughout this review, the focus will be on the experience.near empathic treatment stance as the method by which Kohut arrived at his diagnostic understanding of the narcissistic transferences, and how these are distinguished from the transference neurosis, the borderline personality disorder, and the psychotic/schizophrenic self disorders.

After attending the course participants will be able to:
  • - Describe how Kohut's concept of the experience-near empathic stance is used as a diagnostic tool.
  • - Illustrate how the empathic stance is used to diagnose narcissism, transference neurosis, borderline and psychotic disorders.
  • - Explain Kohut's concept of transferences as differentiated from a Freudian view of transference.
  • - Differentiate archaic fragmented self states from higher level disorders.
Return to top

104.1 Psychoanalytic Models and Core Developmental Issues II: An Historical Overview

Edward Ross, 22.5 contact hours

This course will follow the development of psychoanalytic thought, culminating with the early writings of Kohut. These include readings on empathy, narcissism, self, and selfobject. In particular, emphasis will be on the fundamental switch from a biological-based drive/defense psychology to a psychology based on selfobject needs.

After attending the course participants will be able to:
  • - Explain Kohut's development of his theories on empathy, narcissism, self, and selfobject.
  • - Describe Kohut's shift from the Freudian biological model to a self psychological model.
  • - Explain the development of the concept of empathic immersion.
  • - Discuss Kohut's development of defense of the self differentiated from drive impulses.
Return to top

104.2 Personality Development and Psychoanalytic Perspective II

Penny Rosen, 22.5 contact hours

This course is the second half of course 101.2 that continues a comparison and contrast of different psychoanalytic models of development that have evolved from the understanding of human personality development. It will trace the evolution of British and American Object Relations Theories, culminating in the early discovery by Heinz Kohut of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology. Focus in the latter study will be upon Kohut's early writings on empathy, narcissism, the development of the theory of the self and the selfobject concept. As well, emphasis will be on the fundamental shift from a biological.based drive/defense psychology (Id, Ego and Superego) to a psychology based on the self and the selfobject needs.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Discuss the evolution of the different theories of personality.
  • - Explain the constructs of the theory of the self and the selfobject as defined by Kohut.
  • - Describe Kohut's concept of empathy.
  • - Define Kohut's concept of narcissism.
  • - Describe the shift from Freud's drive theory to Kohut's theory of the self.
Return to top

201.0 Works of Heinz Kohut II

David MacIsaac, 22.5 contact hours

In this course the students will examine Kohut's gradual evolution from the traditional psychoanalytic model (id, ego, and superego) to the concept of the self as a supraordinate structure. Kohut's 1977 work, The Restoration of the Self, will be the primary text of this course.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Discuss Kohut's major contributions in The Restoration of the Self.
  • - Describe how Kohut's theory was a departure from Freud's structural model.
  • - Explain Kohut's theory of the self as a supraordinate structure.
Return to top

202.1 Psychoanalytic Process I: Resistance, Transference and Countertransference

Penny Rosen, 22.5 contact hours

In this seminar, continuing the utilization of the empathic approach, defenses and resistances to the developing selfobject transferences and their working through will be highlighted and explored through the use of case material. Countertransference issues will be identified as impediments to the treatment's ongoing progress.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Define the terms resistance, transference and countertransference.
  • - Demonstrate the use of empathy through clinical examples.
  • - Describe the selfobject transferences, as they emerge through the use of case vignettes.
  • - Explain the impact of countertransference on the treatment.
Return to top

202.2 Psychoanalytic Process II: Resistance, Transference, and Countertransference

Process notes reflecting the moment to moment interaction of the patient and therapist will be used as the basis of instruction and discussion. The focus will be on the integration of the clinical concepts highlighted in both the readings and the class discussions. The course will consistently focus on the general principles of psychoanalytic technique. With emphasis on the experience.near empathic treatment stance, particular attention will be given to the concepts of transference, countertransference, resistance and defense.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Illustrate the developmental changes that occur in ongoing treatment through the emergence of new selfobject transferences.
  • - Explain the different stages of selfobject development, using case vignettes.
  • - Define transference, countertransferrence, resistance and defenses through clinical work.
Return to top

203.0 The Works of Heinz Kohut III

Edward Ross, 22.5 contact hours

This course will examine the later writing of Heinz Kohut. His posthumously published monograph, How Does Analysis Cure?, will be the primary text. Defense and resistance, constituents of the self, the process of cure, and the place of empathy in cure are some of the topics that will be explored. The self psychological perspective will be compared to the traditional view.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Describe Kohut's theory of empathy in the process of cure.
  • - Explain Kohut's concept of the working through of the various defenses and resistances in ongoing treatment.
  • - Demonstrate Kohut's concept of cure with those of other theorists.
Return to top

204.1 Theory of Psychopathology I: The Higher Level Self Disorders

Crayton Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

This course will compare and contrast the understanding of psychopathology in classical analytic theory and that of psychoanalytic self psychology. There will be a review of the differing symptomatology of the psychoneurosis versus that of the self disorder, and how these symptoms are understood from each perspective. Particular emphasis will be upon the narcissistic personality disorder (later the self disorder), narcissistic behavior disorder, and the Oedipal level self disorder, demonstrating how these differ from the classical oedipal conflict and transference neurosis. Issues of analyzability related to higher level self disorders and what constitutes cure in the analytic process will be reviewed.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Explain the differences between Kohut's view of self disorders and other views of psychopathology.
  • - Describe Self Psychology's perspective on psychoneurosis (self disorders).
  • - Discuss the treatment of narcissistic personality disorder, using Self psychological conceptualizations.
  • - Identify how Self psychological treatment approaches the Oedipal level self disorder.
Return to top

301.1 Psychoanalytic Process III: Resistance, Transference, and Countertransference

Sandra Rzetlny, 22.5 contact hours

In this course the psychoanalytic candidate will focus on the middle and terminating phases of treatment. Emphasis will be on defense and resistance, working through, and the development of the selfobject transferences. Focus will also be on the importance of the ambient environment and the disruption.restoration sequence as two factors essential for structural change. Case material from instructor and students will be the tool by which these clinical concepts are learned.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Distinguish the middle and the terminating phases of the treatment based upon the emergence and working through of the selfobject transferences.
  • - Explain the curative process of transmuting internalization, the meaning of optimal frustration and its place in the curative process.
  • - Differentiate defense as understood in classical psychoanalytic treatment and its meaning in psychoanalytic self psychology.
  • - Identify countertransference reactions versus countertransference proper.
Return to top

302.0 Processes of the Unconscious: Fantasy, Dreams and Symbolism

Edward Ross, 22.5 contact hours

This course will highlight the central role of fantasy, dreams and symbolism in psychoanalytic treatment. The similarities and differences between the self psychological perspective and traditional view will be explored. Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams will be studied in depth.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Identify the thread of similarity in dreams, fantasy and symbolism, the unconscious components in each and how each is dealt with in the treatment.
  • - Explain how the meaning of the dream is arrived at, i.e., identifying the "day residue", the associative process that unfolds the manifest content and reveals the latent content resulting in an interpretation.
  • - Define Freud's meaning of dreams and Heinz Kohut's expansion of that meaning, demonstrating through the analysis of a dream how these two are linked.
  • - Define the "self-state" dream of self psychology, explain why it's unanalyzable, distinguish it from the dream as Freud defined it and explain how it can assist the analysand who has been traumatized in the undifferentiated selfobject by facing the "nothingness" of his existence.
Return to top

302.1 Beginning Understanding of Fantasy, Dreams and Symbolism: A Clinical Practicum

Frances Levine, 22.5 contact hours

Models of dream formation shape dream interpretation. Focusing on the comparison of current models of dream formation and interpretation, this course will provide an historical perspective on the evolution of theory and practice both within as well as between orientations. The latter half of the course will focus on self psychological innovations and revisions of the classical approach. Similarities and differences between these approaches will be highlighted and discussed. Application of the dream models will be illustrated in the candidates and instructor's clinical material.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Explain the various models of dream interpretation as well as the differences among each one. In particular the participant will be able to distinguish the Freudian interpretation of dreams as wish fulfillment vs. a self psychological " actualization" model that places self-development in the place of prominence.
  • - Explain Freud's vs. Kohut's different understandings of dreams via a clinical review of The Two Analyses of Mr. Z (Kohut,1979).
  • - Explain Kohut's classical interpretation of the dream at the conclusion of the first analysis of The Two Analyses of Mr. Z, while detailing the self psychological interpretation of the same dream at the start of the second.
  • - Describe a dream to demonstrate clearly the two different psychoanalytic theories of dreams.
  • - Identify the "day residue," the manifest content, associations to various pieces of the manifest content, and the meaning of the dream by linking it up with the day residue.
Return to top

303.0 Theory of Psychopathology II: Severe Self Disorders

Crayton Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

This course is a continuation of course 204.1.There will be particular focus on the psychopathology of borderline and psychotic self disorders, with emphasis on the archaic nature of the selfobject transference typical of these disorders. Symptoms such as anxiety, depression, phobias, conversion reactions, obsessions, compulsions, and perversions will be looked at in relation to these disorders.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Explain a self psychological perspective, as Kohut described it, of the borderline and psychotic individuals whom he maintained were unanalyzable.
  • - Define Crayton Rowe's undifferentiated selfobject and demonstrate clinically how early interruptions of this selfobject redirect the infant's "discovery" from the linking with the positive and to going more and more negative.
  • - Identify and distinguish Kohut's higher level self disorders that are clearly analyzable and Crayton Rowe's severe self disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorders, eating disorders, suicide and depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity behavior that are also analyzable.
  • - Explain the differences in treatment between Kohut and Rowe's different level self disorder such as in dream interpretation and the analysis of later trauma and why these differences are essential.
Return to top

304.1 Contrasting Views in Self Psychology: Clinical Applications

Penny Rosen, 22.5 contact hours

This course will review the writings of those contemporary authors whose theories have contributed different perspectives to diagnosis and psychopathology in self psychology. These new theories, which will be examined and contrasted with mainstream self psychology, will be Intersubjectivity, Contextualism, Optimal Responsiveness, Motivational Systems, and Attachment Theory. Process material from both the instructor and the students' practices will be utilized to show how these theories are applied in the clinical setting.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Define the selfobject construct in Traditional Self Psychology by citing the shifts in its meaning from Kohut's earliest writings to his latest.
  • - Discuss Kohut's definition of the selfobject and explain why it is not an object.
  • - Explain the differences in the definition of the selfobject in Traditional Self Psychology from the meanings in the various contrasting views such as Intrersubjectivity Optimal Responsiveness, Motivational Systems and Attachment Theory.
  • - Describe how the differing meaning of selfobject in Traditional Self Psychology from the contrasting views impacts the clinical stance.
Return to top

401.0 Continuous Case Seminar I

Florence Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

In this seminar the students will follow the progress of clinical cases in order to experience in detail the unfolding of the psychoanalytic process. The experience-near mode of data gathering will be emphasized as the basis for understanding and interpreting in the clinical setting.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Describe the introspective-empathic stance, the distinction between understanding and explaining, and the analysis of defense and resistance.
  • - Identify and trace the early selfobject transference in treatment, how through defense and resistance analysis a new and different selfobject transference emerged.
  • - Explain experience-near empathic attunement to the self's modulating states as well as how counter-transference may interfere with the empathic process.
  • - Define the format for formal presentations and written submissions for publication.
Return to top

402.1 Depression and Suicide as an Addiction: A Practicum

Frances Levine, 22.5 contact hours

The class will focus on the practical application of the theory that will be learned through readings, class lecture and discussion, and the examination of clinical material. Particular attention will be given to the different meanings of depression in the psychoanalytic literature and the place of transference, countertransference and the working through process in the treatment of these patients. Depression as an addiction will be discussed in detail, defining what is meant by addiction and examining its validity in the clinical setting. Empirical research will also be examined for substantiation of this hypothesis.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Define the self psychological concept of depression.
  • - Differentiate the self psychological definition of depression from other major theoretical perspectives in psychoanalysis.
  • - Identify the fixated selfobject need that becomes linked with past trauma.
  • - Demonstrate the working through process in the treatment of a suicidal depressed patient.
  • - Distinguish countertransferential reactions from evoked feelings in the treatment of the severely depressed patient.
Return to top

403.0 Continuous Case Seminar II

Edward Ross, 22.5 contact hours

This seminar is a continuation of course 401.0 In this seminar the students will follow the progress of clinical cases in order to experience in detail the unfolding of the psychoanalytic process. The experience-near mode of data gathering will be emphasized as the basis for understanding and interpreting in the clinical setting.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Describe the experience near mode of listening as a tool for clinical practice.
  • - Differentiate the concept of "understanding" from that of "interpretation".
  • - Discuss the impact of countertransference on clinical psychoanalytic process.
  • - Identify emerging selfobject transferences in clinical material.
Return to top

404.0 Advanced Clinical Seminar on Dreams

David MacIsaac, 22.5 contact hours

This seminar will examine the dream in clinical practice. The dream and its interpretation from a self psychology perspective will be examined within the treatment situation. In addition to Kohut's writings, other authors who have contributed to the literature on dreams in self psychology will be discussed.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Differentiate dream interpretation in the case of higher self disorders from earlier fixations in the undifferentiated selfobject.
  • - Demonstrate the interpretation of a dream that includes day residue, manifest content, free associative processes and interpretation.
  • - Identify how the patient's use of dreams can portray the direction of progress, development or regression within the context of the treatment.
Return to top

* 501.0 An Experiential Workshop

Crayton Rowe, 6 contact hours
(meets 3 times for 2 hours each, on alternate Sundays starting the second Sunday in September through October, from 12:00 - 2:00 pm):

  • Fall Term: September 11, 25; October 9, 2016
  • Fall Term: September 10, 24; October 8, 2017
  • Fall Term: September 9, 23; October 7, 2018

This workshop will be an ongoing group meeting in which students of the Institute will have an opportunity to develop their empathic abilities. Various exercises will be employed to assist participants in attaining this goal. This workshop will meet at planned intervals over the course of training.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Identify exercises to enhance one's own sensory perceptions
  • - Identify the process of attunement to the experience of others in the clinical situation.
  • - Describe the process of introspection to one's own emotional life
  • - Identify one's own specific evoked negative and positive reactions in the clinical situation
  • - Identify evidence of one's own specific unconscious countertransference reactions in the clinical situation.
Return to top

502.0 Seminar on Professional Ethics

Sandra Rzetlny, 22.5 contact hours

This seminar will review principles of ethics as they apply to psychoanalytic practice concerning boundaries and boundary violations, confidentiality, competence, illness, exploitation, relationship with colleagues, and other related topics. Ethical standards accepted by major mental health organizations, including sources from professional handbooks and legal regulatory guidelines will be reviewed.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Discuss boundary violations, its implications for treatment, and the importance for consultation when at risk.
  • - Discuss patients' legal rights for privacy and confidentiality, including writing for presentation and/or publication.
  • - Explain the procedures colleagues are encouraged to take with therapists whose abilities to function professionally are impaired.
  • - Describe the parameters set up in treatment to avoid boundary violations.
Return to top

503.0 Seminar on Case Presentation

Crayton Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

With a review of the theories in self psychology, this seminar will cover techniques for organizing and integrating clinical and theoretical material for publication and presentations. The emerging selfobject transferences and countertransference influences will be integrated in and applied to the composition of final case.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Define the major points in the development of a clinical case from the beginning to termination, incorporating theory and technique.
  • - Demonstrate the development of a clinical case through oral presentations for professional meetings, applying theoretical constructs in self psychology.
  • - Demonstrate the development of a clinical case through written presentations for publication, applying theoretical constructs of selfobject transferences.
Return to top

504.0 Advanced Seminar on the Selfobject Transference

Crayton Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

This seminar will focus on the more traditional selfobject transference of idealizing, mirroring, and twinship as well as the recently discovered undifferentiated selfobject transference. Focus will be on how the development of these transferences take place and the effect that trauma has on their development.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Define Kohut's basic selfobject constructs of mirror, twinship, and idealizing selfobject.
  • - Define extensions of Kohut's selfobject constructs, such as Rowe's fundamental undifferentiated selfobject and Wolf's adversarial selfobject
  • - Demonstrate the clinical use of Kohut's basic selfobject constructs
  • - Demonstrate the clinical use of extensions of Kohut's basic constructs.
  • - Demonstrate the clinical differences in the use of selfobjects with that of objects as used in object relations
Return to top

505.0 Research Methodology in Psychoanalysis

Edward Ross, 22.5 contact hours

This course will survey the methods used in scientific research as they apply to psychoanalysis and related psychological fields. A primary goal of the course will be to examine the perceived gap between clinical approaches and formal research, and to understand how this gap may be bridged. Topics for reading and discussion will include the basics of observational, correlational and experimental methods; the strengths and weaknesses of the individual case study; essential concepts of statistical analysis and experimental design; the application of infant research; direct testing of psychoanalytic theories (especially with self psychology); research on sleep and dreaming; in addition to process and outcome research on psychotherapy and psychoanalysis; and finally, what is the difference between experience.near and experience.distant data.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Describe some of the current research validating the efficacy of psychoanalysis.
  • - Describe ethical considerations and procedures to protect human subjects engaged in psychoanalytic research.
  • - Demonstrate methods in evaluating psychoanalytic research.
  • - Demonstrate familiarity with basic research terminology
  • - Describe some useful research resources.
Return to top

505.1 Sociocultural Influences on Development and Psychopathology I

Florence Rowe, 22.5 contact hours

This is the first of a two.part course that focuses upon culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age and religion..how these factors can enhance normal personality development and, at times, lead to psychopathological digressions. Adaptation of assessment and treatment techniques with these differing cultural groups will be addressed in assigned readings, class discussion and clinical case material.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Describe the impact of sociocultural variables upon the development of the self.
  • - Assess prejuducial-countertransferential issues in the treatment process.
  • - Describe the fluidity of gender identification.
  • - Describe the contributions of neuroscience in understanding gender development.
  • - Examine the traditional theories of male and female development in light of contemporary gender theory.
Return to top

505.2 Sociocultural Influences on Development and Psychopathology II

Frances Levine, 22.5 contact hours

This course is the second half of a two semester course that commenced with 505.1. This course will examine the concepts of culture, race, class, gender/sexual identity and how these factors challenge the analyst's empathy for, and clinical responsiveness to, his/her patients. The influences of these factors on human development, personality formation and psychopathology will be explored in the writings of psychoanalytic theorists such as Freud, Altman and other more contemporary authors. Clinical presentations will be discussed in order to make the theory clinically relevant.

After attending the course, participants will be able to:
  • - Describe the effects of sociocultural factors on the self and early development.
  • - Explain how patients of diverse cultures affect the transference and countertransfernce.
  • - Describe if resistance manifests differently when patient and therapist are of diverse cultures and/or diverse sexual orientation.
  • - Describe how empathic attunement can impact the treatment of patients of multicultural backgrounds.